inspiration reservoir


sketchblog: http://feignedsobriquet.tumblr.com

victoriousvocabulary:

WRONA
[noun] 
Polish: crow.
[Mister Beaudry]

victoriousvocabulary:

WRONA

[noun]

Polish: crow.

[Mister Beaudry]

(via swingdownlove)

839 notes

geewizzard:

by KlausPillon

828 notes

bobbycaputo:

Instead of Shooting People, this Guy Plays Grand Theft Auto as a War Photographer

Talk about choosing your own adventure! Reddit user cy_sperling decided to participate in Grand Theft Auto V’s online multiplayer mode as a war photographer/photojournalist.

To avoid being targeted as an enemy and notify other online players of his ‘reporting’, his custom character wears a black jacket with ‘MEDIA’ printed across the back. He also wears a helmet and tries his best to drive around in a WEZL News Van. The pictures are taken with the in-game cell phone’s camera feature.

The redditor’s day job is a movie editor so he knows a thing or two about framing. If you’re interested in seeing more, check out the Media Lens Crew page at Rockstar Games Social Club.

(via elsajeni)

3,376 notes

(Source: groteleur, via mistressofdurinsline)

1,250 notes

maptitude1:

These maps, by reddit user sp07, show the relationships between various European languages by highlighting the similarities and differences between their words for apple, bear, beer, church, cucumber, orange, pineapple, rose, and tea. I’ve posted some of these maps before (and even made a few of my own), but since they’ve been getting some recent attention around the internet, I thought I’d consolidate them.

(via nondesignated)

2,590 notes

sosuperawesome:

Mum draws the faces, daughter draws the bodies.. Lovely blog post about collaborative art here

Their print shop here

(Source: sosuperawesome)

165,070 notes

theonlymagicleftisart:

Mixed Media Paintings by Brad Kunkle

Website | Facebook | Instagram

Want the bridge the gap between your favorite Tumblr Artists and receive actual physical items from them? Click here to find out more!

(via swingdownlove)

5,440 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Andrew Wyeth - Wolves

likeafieldmouse:

Andrew Wyeth - Wolves

(via theunseeliequeen)

6,242 notes

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Kate MccGwires Feather sculptures

Kate MccGwire’s feather sculptures are awe inspiring in their detail; they are the type of thing that is marveled. Gathering, peeling, and layering are just a few ways she constructs her work. The materials, vibrant colors, and tactile quality gives them an uncanny feeling.

(via asylum-art)

21,658 notes

itscolossal:

A Lion Made from 4,000 Pieces of Hammered Metal by Selçuk Yılmaz

41,972 notes

sunfell:

creaturesfromdreams:

Angelarium by Peter Mohrbacher

—-x—-

More: | Angels | Random |

(via relvetica)

62,986 notes


Astronomical Clock. Old Times Square, Prague

Astronomical Clock. Old Times Square, Prague

(Source: adventuresofthetruekind, via notanightlight)

25,185 notes

2headedsnake:

Kevin Francis Gray

Face-off (detail), 2007, bronze, automotive, paint, wood plinth

Goth Girl, 2008, fiberglass resin, glass beads, automotive paint, wood

Temporal Sitter bust, 2012, marble

Temporal Sitter, 2012, patinad bronze, bardigilio marble

Hold Tight (detail), 2006, fiberglass resin, glass beads

(Source: kevinfrancisgray.com)

26,646 notes

Majo Fruithof Collection Shot by Patrizio Di Renzo

(Source: forgetcookies, via youmaythinkyouknowme)

22,575 notes

daisyrazor:

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T
Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library





A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).
Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.
After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).
The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).
-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)






TAKETH ONE UNICORNE.

daisyrazor:

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T

Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library

A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

image

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).

Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.

After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

image

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).

The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

image

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).

-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

TAKETH ONE UNICORNE.

(via queenklu)

7,320 notes